Support when you need it most

The Dementia Jersey team are here to point you in the right direction and offer every support we can to people with dementia, family, friends and carers.

Information for the whole family

Find information and advice on the symptoms and diagnosis of dementia and tips for people living with or affected by dementia.

Fundraising
and support

There are many ways you can help us, including fundraising, corporate support, or volunteering for one of our main activities.

We are helping to make Jersey a more dementia friendly island. We want all those people affected by dementia, or living with the disease to be understood, welcomed and supported.

Latest News and Information from Dementia Jersey

We would like to say a huge thank you to one of our 2022 Corporate Partners, La Moye Golf Club, for their support so far. Earlier this Summer, the club hosted their Captain's Charity Day and raised an incredible £8,218. All money raised will go towards supporting people in Jersey living with dementia.

We couldn’t do the work we do without the generous support from others. If you would like to find out about corporate sponsorship opportunities or information on being a corporate partner, please email nadine@dementia.je

Help us move closer to our aim of making Jersey a dementia friendly island.

#DementiaJersey #CorporatePartner #Dementia #DoingItForDementia #Fundraising
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Who gets dementia?

There are currently around 900,000 people in the UK living with dementia. It mainly affects people over the age of 65. The likelihood of developing dementia increases significantly with age. One in 14 people aged over 65 has dementia. This rises to 1 in 6 for people aged over 80.

Dementia can affect younger people too. This is often called young-onset dementia. Around 1 in 20 people with dementia are younger than 65. There are more than 42,000 people in the UK under 65 with dementia. Dementia is also more common among women than men.

Why do some people get dementia and not others?

It is not always clear why some people get dementia while others don’t. It can depend on a combination of age, genes, lifestyle and other health conditions. Most types of dementia are not passed down (inherited) from a parent to a child. There are a few genes that will cause dementia if they are passed from a parent to a child – known as ‘familial’ genes. However, familial genes are rare.

Some things can increase your chances of developing dementia, including:

High blood pressure
Physical inactivity
Drinking too much alcohol
Smoking
Hearing loss
Diet.

However, evidence shows there are things a person can do to reduce their risk of getting dementia, especially if they do them mid-life (aged 40–65).

If you have had a recent diagnosis of dementia, Dementia Jersey provide a confidential counselling service which gives you the opportunity to talk with a trained professional who is there to listen and support you through difficult times, to help bring about effective changes and enhanced wellbeing.

This service is available for people with dementia and the family or friends supporting or caring for someone with dementia. There is no charge for this service. To book please email info@dementia.je or Tel: 01534 723519

#DementiaJersey
#WorldAlzheimersMonth
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What are the symptoms of dementia

Each person experiences dementia in their own individual way. Different types of dementia also tend to affect people differently, especially in the early stages. However, there are some common early signs and symptoms of dementia. These include:
• Memory loss – for example, problems recalling things that happened recently
• Difficulty concentrating, planning or organising – for example, struggling to make decisions, solve problems or follow a series of steps (such as cooking a meal)
• Problems with language and communication – for example, difficulties following a conversation or finding the right word for something.
• Misunderstanding what is being seen – for example, problems judging distances (such as on stairs) or perceiving the edges of objects, and misinterpreting patterns or reflections
• Being confused about time or place – for example, losing track of the time or date, or becoming confused about where they are.
• Mood changes or difficulty controlling emotions – for example, becoming unusually anxious, irritable, sad or frightened, losing interest in things and personality changes.

With some types of dementia, the person may have difficulty knowing what is real and what isn’t. They may see or hear things that are not really there (hallucinations), or strongly believe things that are not true (delusions). However, having symptoms like memory problems does not always mean a person has dementia. Dementia-like symptoms can be caused by other conditions, such as: alcohol-related brain damage - mild cognitive impairment - functional cognitive decline.

If you have had a recent diagnosis of dementia, Dementia Jersey provide a confidential counselling service which gives you the opportunity to talk with a trained professional who is there to listen and support you through difficult times, to help bring about effective changes and enhanced wellbeing. To book please email info@dementia.je or Tel: 01534 723519
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